McCart Lookout, built in 1939 and named for longtime district employee Bill McCart, is a classic example of the L-4 series developed in 1929 by Forest Service engineer Clyde Fickes. The prefabricated wood-frame house was packed in by mules, and…

Gold strikes at Bannack and Alder Gulch brought Irish immigrant Peter Whaley to Montana in the 1860s. Whaley’s wife and nine children shared his adventures, including his service as the first agent on the Flathead Reservation, until the family…

Amidst economic prosperity brought on by the local “apple boom,” Stevensville physician Dr. William Thornton established this surgical center, then the only such facility in the entire Bitterroot Valley. Completed in 1910, builder W. R. Rodgers used…

Considerable skill made up for a lack of capital when Scottish-born John McLaughlin arrived in Stevensville in 1895. He immediately began to practice his trade as a blacksmith, setting up shop across the street from this property, which he purchased…

Farmer Thomas McFarlane and his wife, Ellie, built this comfortable two-story gable-front-and-wing home in 1895. Turned porch supports and fish-scale shingles decorate the front façade. Those features are associated with the Queen Anne style, but the…

George May and brother Albert entered the sheep and cattle business here in 1892, leasing Fort Owen where George lived and where his children were born. As the business succeeded, he continued to purchase land, including in 1899 the plot where this…

Albert May came to the Bitterroot valley with his four brothers in 1892. The Canadian-born May brothers raised stock, farmed, and operated several Stevensville businesses. Albert, his wife Phoebe, and daughter Alberta settled into this home circa…

Stevensville, officially platted in 1879, was hardly on the map when John and Mary Landram came to the Bitterroot in 1875. Landram, a native of Missouri and a carpenter by trade, put his skills to immediate use helping to build the frame buildings…

In 1905, a devastating fire swept through Stevensville destroying many of the town’s vulnerable wooden buildings. The tragedy prompted local officials to pass an ordinance requiring architects and contractors to build with non-flammable materials.…